mobile drug testing long island

USA Mobile Drug Testing of Central Long Island 516-802-3546 Legal NYS DNA Paternity Testing

Archive for the month “May, 2012”

USA Mobile Drug Testing of Central Long Island to Exhibit at HIA-LI 24th Annual Trade Show

and Conference–Long Island’s Largest Business-to-Business Event to be held at the Suffolk County Community College Sports & Exhibition Complex, Brentwood Campus; Thursday, May 24, 2012; 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

HAUPPAUGE, NEW YORK, May 21, 2012 –USA Mobile Drug Testing of Central Long Island, today announced it will exhibit at the HIA-LI 24th Annual Trade Show and Conference. Customers and other business attendees are encouraged to visit Company at both 518 to learn more about its DRUG FREE WORK PLACE services and helping individuals receive drug testing services . HIA-LI, the recognized voice for business on Long Island, in partnership with the Long Island Forum for Technology (LIFT) and Suffolk County Community College (SCCC), will host an expected crowd of thousands of attendees and hundreds of exhibitors during Long Island’s largest business-to-business conference on Thursday, May 24, 2012 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM at the Suffolk County Community College Sports & Exhibition Complex, Brentwood Campus. Attendees may avoid a $10 walk-in fee by pre-registering at http://hia-li.org/calendarDetails.cfm?eventID=1539. Prospective exhibitors and sponsors can learn more about the show at http://hia-li.org/tradeshow2012/.

“USA Mobile Drug Testing of Centtal Long Island is excited to exhibit among our Long Island business peers and we welcome attendees to our booth during the show,” said Janet Matteo, President of USAMDT CLI. “Our team looks forward to educating and informing visitors to our booth about our services & some special offerings.”

“We are pleased to have USA Mobile Drug Testing join us as an exhibitor for this year’s annual HIA-LI trade show and conference. Each year we assemble sponsors and exhibitors from the business, technology, professional, educational and governmental segments to conduct business, generate sales leads, and participate in a series of topical seminars,” said Terri Alessi–Miceli, President of HIA-LI. “With our executive programs and seminars, the Trade Show also becomes a forum for important discussions on economic, business and workforce development.”

About HIA-LI
HIA-LI helps Long Island businesses prosper. For over 30 years, we have been the recognized voice for business on Long Island and a powerful force and economic engine for regional development. We provide a forum for business leaders to network, problem solve and obtain advice on critical issues facing their businesses. Our member companies represent tens of thousands of business professionals. We’re headquartered in and support one of the largest industrial parks in the United States. HIA-LI programs and events promote strategic partnerships, targeted networking, and information sharing and business advocacy. Members benefit from our committees, educational programs, career resources, research capabilities, mentoring opportunities and business advisory services. For more information, visit http://www.hia-li.org/ or call 631-543-5355.
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TRADE SHOW CONTACT:
Terri Alessi-Miceli, HIA-LI
631-543-5355; talessi@hia-li.org

USAMDT CLI 516-802-3546

usamdt.com/central.longisland

 

This drug is one of the most widely distributed drugs in North America

Lets play name that drug. Email Central.longisland@usamdt.com to see if you are correct. Now read on…
 The active ingredient in this drug is extracted from the leaves of a rather prosaic looking plant, a shrub to be exact. Despite its widespread presence in the United States, this shrub cannot grow there. It requires some unique soil and environmental conditions to grow. Unlike marijuana, this plant is finicky. It is about as different from marijuana as any drug could be. This month’s mystery drug is a central nervous stimulant. But more revealing is that this drug is also a topical anesthetic. If properly formulated, this month’s drug can be a very effective medication, one that facilitates some very delicate surgical procedures. If this drug is improperly formulated, it takes on a Robert Louis Stevenson identity, a sort of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde personality. These effects are especially true if the drug is smoked and inhaled into the lungs. When ingested in that manner, this month’s drug becomes a monster.

Any guesses yet?

During the civil war, some experts promoted the drug as a putative treatment for soldiers who had become addicted to morphine. That did not work. Others proposed the drug as a tonic for an array of emotional ills. Especially with melancholia, this month’s drug seemed to instantly erase signs of the “blues” or depression. Ironically however, extended use of the drug actually triggered a very deep depression that would often digress into a paranoia and withdrawal from social interactions. These effects are seen with modern users of this drug as well. In fact, the onerous side effects from chronic use of the drug are more pronounced in the modern era.

Do you think you know?

Our featured drug is perhaps the most hated illicit drug in the world. It has been the central figure in the destabilization of countries located in the southern hemisphere. In the United States, the drug has been the proximate cause of a great deal of inner-city violence. There, the drug has become the currency for a wide array of legal and illegal activities. The drug has been the staple product and principal source of income for criminal gangs. In fact, the more notorious street gangs in America fueled their growth in the 80s and 90s from sales of this drug.

The most critical moment in this drug’s history came at the point when users discovered that the drug could be easily converted into a water insoluble form that could be smoked. When this happened, users discovered that this very potent stimulant drug could be delivered to the brain in a matter of seconds once it had been heated beyond its melting point. The street name given to this form of the drug was a play on the noise that the drug would make when heated on pie tins in kitchen ovens, a process designed to quickly convert the drug into its smokable form. As they say, that was a “game changer.” An entire line of paraphernalia evolved to facilitate the smoking of this drug. Legions of addicts grew out of this period and destined this drug for its reputation as a uniquely destructive substance.

Those who are addicted are easy to identify. Users of this drug exhibit very noticeable symptoms of intoxication. As a central nervous system stimulant, the drug triggers pronounced excitation. Users display pronounced dilated pupils and an overall pattern of hyper activity. Speech becomes rapid and emotional; gestures move quickly and are exaggerated. This drug is short acting, arguably, the shortest acting drug in the current lineup of major abused drugs. Because of its short half-life, users will display serial patterns of use where the intervals between doses may only last 10-15 minutes. This drug is an anorectic, it blunts appetite and convinces users that they have eaten when they have not. It convinces users of a list of many things that are not true. It is also perhaps one of the most difficult drugs to detoxifyfrom; there are no known maintenance drugs or pharmaceutical preparations that directly reduce cravings and urges.

Do you have the answer? Confirm it with USA Mobile Drug Testing of Central Long Island, and if you think there are any problems in your workplace…we can confirm it..

This month’s drug is a monster. Just ask an addict, one in recovery, or one still actively using. Their stories will always be the same.
Now email us Central.LongIsland@usamdt.comto see if you guessed correctly 🙂
Thank you Medtox for a wonderful article.

New York Assoc of Alcoholism & Substance Abuse, meet John Coppola

USA Mobile Drug Testing of Central Long Island 516-802-3546 wishes John well in his quest to help NYS with drug problems. USAMDT can assist you with testing needs. Read about John:

What he does: For the last 16 years, Coppola has been the face of drug counselors and treatment centers in the halls of the Capitol. His association, known by its acronym ASAP, includes more than 250 members and some 20 coalitions — everyone from methadone clinics to Alcoholics Anonymous.

How he got here: Coppola was born in Brooklyn, moved a lot as a child but settled in a Hudson Valley boarding school with an eye toward becoming a Roman Catholic priest. He demurred, but after studying at Orange County Community College and Dominican College ended up in 1979 at the University at Albany pursuing a master’s degree in social work. He got an internship with Catholic Charities in Montgomery County, and was hired after graduation in 1981.

Personal: If you put your toes on the ground in Coppola’s back yard, off Washington Avenue Extension in the Pine Bush, it feels just like the beach. When he can get away from Albany for vacation, the 56-year-old says you’ll never find him far from the water — either the ocean or a beach — and usually with a paperback mystery novel to complete the mindless escape. A divorced father of three and grandfather of five, Coppola says he spends most of his free time catching up with old friends. He does make a mean meatball, though.

There aren’t many people who grow up dreaming of a career in substance abuse counseling. How did you end up in this line of work?

I think I was always able to see the potential in people. When you work in this field, you have daily experience with people who have completely turned their lives around. A lot of us would look at someone who’s homeless, in the street, and see them as lost, and a lost cause. But every once in a while I’ll meet someone who was one of those people at one time, and now they’re walking around, going to a job.

How have the attitudes and approach to dealing with these issues changed over time?

Science has told us so much. We now know that addiction is a disease rooted in brain chemistry, and people who are addicted have a physiology that is different than people who aren’t. When I first started counseling people we had some ideas about abstaining from use, and we didn’t really understand back in those days about which unhealthy behaviors could lead to others.

What about the government’s approach?

Historically, it’s been horrible. Because there’s so much stigma associated with it, frequently it’s the first thing that gets cut. One of the things I believe passionately is that Gov. Cuomo, in his first State of the State, said we have to get better results and make better use of our resources, collaborating across different systems. When I think about addiction treatment, prevention and recovery, in my opinion, that is an amazing driving force that can accomplish all three. If we want to try and reduce child abuse and neglect, we know that 80 percent of mothers and fathers who do that to their children have an addiction problem. But the system is not designed to deal with parents; it’s designed to protect kids. So as soon as you introduce treatments, abuse and neglect practically disappears — the kids are safer, and you don’t need to put them in out-of-home placement. It seems to me that right now, in New York state, the ground is more fertile than it’s ever been to try and reduce the investment.

What kinds of cases are providers seeing the most of?

The number of deaths that are attributable to prescription medications dwarfs the heroin crisis of the mid-’60s. That’s the biggest trend now — it’s alarming and it’s completely out of control. It’s just that we’ve got better medications, that really work, but they’re highly addictive and people are not being properly educated. And they’re being overprescribed.

— Jimmy Vielkind

Read more: http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/Capital-Profile-John-Coppola-3555682.php#ixzz1uqmQ7kRF

USA Mobile Drug Testing informs you of the desginer drug trends, K2 Spice EightBallz

If you are having a hard time keeping up with the changing trends and the variety of products associated with designer drug use, you are not alone so USAMDT passes along this very informative article from Medtox. If you need any drug testing for personal or business needs email central.longisland@usamdt.com

This market is in a state of flux and, as a result, there has been a flurry of new products that have arrived on the scene. In fact, “glass cleaner” and “novelty powders” have now joined bath salts and incense (K2/Spice) as agents for an alternative drug high. Of concern is the emergence of a product called Eight BallZ. The manufacturer’s choice of the product name is a play on the street slang used by dealers to describe an eighth of an ounce of cocaine; dealers call that product an “8 ball.” With that in mind, readers can surely surmise what this product is about. Like most of its bath salt cousins, this “glass cleaner” is a stimulant. User comments are quite consistent on this point. Eight BallZ energizes the central nervous system and causes a state of euphoria that is reminiscent of cocaine. User experiences seem to vary according to the dose of “glass cleaner” taken. It appears that the higher the dose of the product, the more edgy the experience. The drug is usually snorted or “bumped.” There are scattered reports of users who have injected the powders or “stuffed” them rectally.

 

On the streets, Eight BallZ is one of the more popular alternatives to Ivory Wave (known on the street as “I-V”). Ivory Wave is perhaps the best known of the original bath salts products. Whatever the name of the product, bath salts all share some common markings and language. There are two caveats that are found with nearly every one of these products: “Not intended for human consumption” and “Not to be sold to people under 18 years of age.” But these products have historically been an ever-changing set of formulas and ingredients. And with the enactment of federal law banning the original recipes that featured MDPV and mephedrone, formulas have been in a constant state of flux as they mix and match banned and non-banned powders to create their unique batch.

 

New salts and cleaner products loudly proclaim their “50 State Legal” status. But it is unclear whether any of those claims are true. Some of these purportedly legal products have been spiked with MDPV; others have contained drugs from the phenethylamine family of psychedelic stimulants. Others yet have contained legal stimulants found in diet pills and aphrodisiacs. In fact, one caller to the MEDTOX DAR Hotline, an addiction counselor, said that a client of his swore that the bath salt he had recently snorted was nothing more than crushed up Viagra. (The client evidently had prior experience with Viagra.) Perhaps this bath salt user is correct though. Many “glass cleaner” users boast of the aphrodisiac power of the powder. Recent reports have purported that many contemporary salts and cleaners contain a legal stimulant called methylhexaneamine. The Journal has reported on this substance in the past. Its effects are amphetamine-like, at higher doses it purports to have aphrodisiac powers.

 

Readers should keep an eye out for other salt or cleaner products with names such as “Fine China,” “White Girl,” “Sextacy” and “Drone IV.” At present, the best way to drug test for the use of these products is to contract with a SAMHSA certified laboratory that provides select forensic designer drug screening systems. Sales representatives will be able to guide you through the process of selecting the testing protocol that is best for you. Readers should remember that K2 & Spice products are still out in the marketplace and are widely abused. Synthetic cannabinoid use continues to be a popular alternative to the smoking of marijuana.

Medtox Journal on Drug Abuse Recognition
March  2012

USA Mobile Drug Testing informs you of the desginer drug trends, K2 Spice EightBallz

If you are having a hard time keeping up with the changing trends and the variety of products associated with designer drug use, you are not alone so USAMDT passes along this very informative article from Medtox. If you need any drug testing for personal or business needs email central.longisland@usamdt.com

This market is in a state of flux and, as a result, there has been a flurry of new products that have arrived on the scene. In fact, “glass cleaner” and “novelty powders” have now joined bath salts and incense (K2/Spice) as agents for an alternative drug high. Of concern is the emergence of a product called Eight BallZ. The manufacturer’s choice of the product name is a play on the street slang used by dealers to describe an eighth of an ounce of cocaine; dealers call that product an “8 ball.” With that in mind, readers can surely surmise what this product is about. Like most of its bath salt cousins, this “glass cleaner” is a stimulant. User comments are quite consistent on this point. Eight BallZ energizes the central nervous system and causes a state of euphoria that is reminiscent of cocaine. User experiences seem to vary according to the dose of “glass cleaner” taken. It appears that the higher the dose of the product, the more edgy the experience. The drug is usually snorted or “bumped.” There are scattered reports of users who have injected the powders or “stuffed” them rectally.

 

On the streets, Eight BallZ is one of the more popular alternatives to Ivory Wave (known on the street as “I-V”). Ivory Wave is perhaps the best known of the original bath salts products. Whatever the name of the product, bath salts all share some common markings and language. There are two caveats that are found with nearly every one of these products: “Not intended for human consumption” and “Not to be sold to people under 18 years of age.” But these products have historically been an ever-changing set of formulas and ingredients. And with the enactment of federal law banning the original recipes that featured MDPV and mephedrone, formulas have been in a constant state of flux as they mix and match banned and non-banned powders to create their unique batch.

 

New salts and cleaner products loudly proclaim their “50 State Legal” status. But it is unclear whether any of those claims are true. Some of these purportedly legal products have been spiked with MDPV; others have contained drugs from the phenethylamine family of psychedelic stimulants. Others yet have contained legal stimulants found in diet pills and aphrodisiacs. In fact, one caller to the MEDTOX DAR Hotline, an addiction counselor, said that a client of his swore that the bath salt he had recently snorted was nothing more than crushed up Viagra. (The client evidently had prior experience with Viagra.) Perhaps this bath salt user is correct though. Many “glass cleaner” users boast of the aphrodisiac power of the powder. Recent reports have purported that many contemporary salts and cleaners contain a legal stimulant called methylhexaneamine. The Journal has reported on this substance in the past. Its effects are amphetamine-like, at higher doses it purports to have aphrodisiac powers.

 

Readers should keep an eye out for other salt or cleaner products with names such as “Fine China,” “White Girl,” “Sextacy” and “Drone IV.” At present, the best way to drug test for the use of these products is to contract with a SAMHSA certified laboratory that provides select forensic designer drug screening systems. Sales representatives will be able to guide you through the process of selecting the testing protocol that is best for you. Readers should remember that K2 & Spice products are still out in the marketplace and are widely abused. Synthetic cannabinoid use continues to be a popular alternative to the smoking of marijuana.

Medtox Journal on Drug Abuse Recognition
March  2012

Why do Americans consume 80% of world’s painkiller drugs? Watch video of Rich Ellasar bank robber.

USA Mobile Drug Testing can help you protect your business or your family by offering affordable drug screening. http://www.usamdt.com/central.longisland

Rich Elassar is a victim of the fastest growing drug addiction in the US. The 36-year-old from New Jersey began taking the painkiller Percocet to get high at weekends. Within months, his addiction spiralled out of control and he turned to crime to finance his habit. Mr Elassar served three years in jail robbing a bank and lost his business and his wife as a result. Outside of prison he has struggled to stay clean, relapsing four times.  WATCH HIS VIDEO 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-17963222

Now he is under the care of a physician and taking medication to curb his addiction. He has been clean for more than a year.

Americans consume 80% of opiate painkillers produced in the world, according to congressional testimony by the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians. And addicts are not the only ones impacted by the crisis.

Howard Levine runs a pharmacy on Long Island that was twice robbed by an addict desperate for painkillers. He no longer provides most prescription painkillers.

Unlike drugs like heroin or cocaine, painkiller drugs are legal. Many are now asking whether over-prescription by doctors is making the epidemic worse.

 

 

PRESCRIPTION DRUG abuse begins without you realizing it..

USA Mobile Drug Testing of Central Long Island shares this concerning report:  The findings point to the nation’s growing problem with prescription-drug abuse, according to Quest Diagnostics, which analyzed nearly 76,000 urine samples submitted last year from doctors’ offices and Quest’s patient-service centers. Results were matched with physicians’ records of the drugs prescribed for each patient. Subjects remained anonymous and results from patients of drug-rehabilitation clinics weren’t included.

The results indicated 63% of people on prescription drugs strayed from their doctor’s orders, Quest says, and many of the drugs found were painkillers, sedatives or amphetamines that weren’t prescribed for the sampled patient. Researchers tested for 26 commonly prescribed and abused medications and for illegal drugs, such as marijuana and cocaine. Samples were taken from 46 states and the District of Columbia.

“People have such tremendous access to very powerful prescription drugs,” Jon R. Cohen, Quest’s chief medical officer, tells the Health Blog.

Of the people that didn’t follow their doctors’ orders, two in five weren’t taking any medications even though they had been prescribed, suggesting some people can’t afford them, skip treatments or even divert them to the black market, Quest says. The remaining 60% of misusers were taking medications that weren’t prescribed by their doctors.

Many people also combined drugs without a doctor’s oversight, which is dangerous because of how some medications can interact with each other, Cohen says. Results of misuse were consistent across income levels, gender and the level of health coverage, he adds. One limitation of the study, it notes, is that some patients may have been tested because their doctors suspected misuse. Others were randomly selected.

Health officials have said enough painkillers were prescribed in 2010 to medicate every U.S. adult around the clock for the month. The abundance of prescription painkillers — obtained, in many cases, by swiping pills from a medicine cabinet, rather bought at the street level — helps explain the high level of misuse, says Robert Stutman, a former Drug Enforcement Administration official who consulted with Quest on the project.

Americans “don’t inherently throw our pills away, so they sit in a medicine cabinet, unused,” Stutman says.

http://blogs.wsj.com/health/2012/04/25/study-shows-widespread-misuse-of-prescription-drugs/?goback=.gde_3898178_member_112646013

2012 NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL STRATEGY: Drug Free Work Place is the way to stop the abuse

Contact USA Mobile Drug Testing at central.longisland@usamdt.com to see how we can help you implement a drug free workplace. Read the article from the White House:  “In addition to the youth programs mentioned previously, as our young people enter the workplace and others remain engaged in workforce, it is important to ensure a drug-free workplace. The consequences of illicit drug use in America’s workforce include job-related accidents and injuries, absenteeism, health care costs, and lost productivity.19 Workplace programs that provide clear policies regarding drug use; offer prevention and education opportunities for employers and supervisors; conduct drug testing to detect and deter use; and support referral and treatment for those who have substance use disorders can play a large role in reducing the demand for drugs throughout our Nation and in helping drug users get into treatment. These programs provide employees with the opportunity to self-identify and get help. Often, such programs give employees an opportunity to return to the same job, or a similar job in the same industry, thereby creating an incentive to succeed in their recovery and resume a fulfilling career. Consequently, drug-free workplace programs are beneficial for our labor force, employers, families, and communities in general.”

get the full report at http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/ondcp/2012_ndcs.pdf
Accomplishments

A Drug Policy for the 21st Century:USA Mobile Drug Testing Central Long Island NY can help you and your company with a drug free workplace policy.

Illegal drugs  not only harm a user’s mind and body, they devastate families, communities, and neighborhoods. They jeopardize public safety, prevent too many Americans from reaching their full potential, and place obstacles in the way of raising a healthy generation of young people

To address these challenges, today we are releasing the 2012 National Drug Control Strategy – the Obama Administration’s primary policy blueprint for reducing drug use and its consequences in America.  The President’s inaugural National Drug Control Strategy, published in 2010, charted a new direction in our approach to drug policy.  Today’s Strategy builds upon that approach, which is based on science, evidence, and compassion.

Most important, it is based on the premise that drug addiction is a chronic disease of the brain that can be prevented and treated. Simply put, we are not powerless against the challenge of substance abuse – people can recover, and millions are in recovery.  These individuals are our neighbors, friends and family members. They contribute to our communities, our workforce, our economy, and help make America stronger. 

Our emphasis on addressing the drug problem through a public health approach is grounded in decades of research and scientific study. There is overwhelming evidence that drug prevention and treatment programs achieve meaningful results with significant long-term cost savings. In fact, recent research has shown that each dollar invested in an evidence-based prevention program can reduce costs related to substance use disorders by an average of $18.

But reducing the burden of our Nation’s drug problem stretches beyond prevention and treatment. We need an all of the above approach. To address this problem in a comprehensive way, the President’s new Strategy also applies the principles of public health to reforming the criminal justice system, which continues to play a vital role in drug policy. It outlines ways to break the cycle of drug use, crime, incarceration, and arrest by diverting non-violent drug offenders into treatment, bolstering support for reentry programs that help offenders rejoin their communities, and advancing support for innovative enforcement programs proven to improve public health while protecting public safety. 

Together, we have achieved significant reform in the way we address substance abuse. And the Affordable Care Act will – for the first time – require insurers to cover treatment for drug addiction the same way they would other chronic diseases. This is a revolutionary shift in how we address drug policy in America. 

Over the past three decades, we have reduced illegal drug use in America. Over the long term, rates of drug use among young people today are far lower than they were 30 years ago. More recently cocaine use has dropped nearly 40 percent and meth use has dropped by half. And we can do more. As President Obama has noted, we have successfully changed attitudes regarding rates of smoking and drunk driving, and with your help we can do the same with our illegal drug problem. 

by Quest Diagnostic Aaron Atkinson on April 23, 2012

Click here to see videos and read more about innovative new alternatives to drug control supported by the Obama Administration. Click http://photos.state.gov/libraries/bahamas/8325/pdf/drugreportfactsheet.pdf to download the infographic: “Obama Administration Drug Policy: A Record of Reform” 

By:
Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary of Health and Human Services
Eric Holder, U.S. Attorney General
Gil Kerlikowske, Director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy

A full copy of the 2012 National Drug Control Strategy is available here.http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/ondcp/2012_ndcs.pd

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