mobile drug testing long island

USA Mobile Drug Testing of Central Long Island 516-802-3546 Legal NYS DNA Paternity Testing

Archive for the month “November, 2011”

Is your Department of Transportation Drug & Alcohol testing compliant?

Is Your DOT Drug Testing Program Compliant?

 USA Mobile Drug TestingCompliance Consultants are out in the field helping employers make sure that their required Department of Transportation (DOT) drug and alcohol testing programs are in compliance with Federal regulations.  Employers that are regulated by DOT must ensure that service agents used meet the requirements of the regulations. Recently, DOT again emphasized that many collectors and collection sites continue to make mistakes and errors during the collection process. 

Employers – you should be monitoring the collection facilities or collectors that you hire to make sure they are performing collections correctly and not making the errors .  It is an employer’s responsibility to make sure that the process is in compliance.  Ask your collectors about their training and about their procedures.  Many collectors have not received the five year refresher training required by DOT.

Clients of USA Mobile Drug Testing can be assured that their collections are done properly in complete compliance with all Federal, State and DOT regulations.  USAMDT Compliance Consultants meet the highest standards in the industry with over 120 hours of training completed prior to opening their territory. All collectors utilized by USA Mobile Drug Testing have met all of the DOT qualifications for training and proficiency.  Remember that USA Mobile Drug Testing Compliance Consultants always come to your location to administer all testing and make it compliant, simple, quick and cost-efficient for you.

Mobile Drug Testing in St Paul Minnesota and East and West USA

Great informative video from USA Mobile Drug Testing of St Paul..Tell the world what USA Mobile Drug Testing is about across the USA. If your not in Minnesota, we are across the country, give us a call to find a professional near you.

Mobile County reports Teens are drinking bleach to pass drug tests for school sports

http://www.fox10tv.com/dpp/news/local_news/mobile_county/police-teens-drinking-bleach-to-pass-drug-tests

There is one way to pass a drug test: Steer clear of illegal substances.

Pass this on to your teens, come clean but not with bleach..

MOBILE COUNTY, Ala. (WALA) – People will go to great lengths to pass a drug test, but the Mobile County Sheriff’s Office says there is a popular trend among young people who try to beat these tests and it could kill you. Some have been ingesting bleach.

With a quick search, your browser will be flooded with products claiming to wash away any drugs in your system. There are drinks, chewable tablets and a prosthetic called the Whizzinator.

Sergeant Joe Mahoney with the Mobile County Sheriff’s Office said there is a reason this market exists.”As far as kids go, if they fail a drug test, they get kicked off the team. A probationer – over at the probation office – they go back to jail. An employee, if they fail a drug test they may lose their job,” said Mahoney.

Not everyone scours the web for a drug test solution. Mahoney said some people look no further than under their kitchen sink.

“We have had cases where they have ingested straight bleach, and it caused significant damage to their body,” said Mahoney.

Household bleach strips chemicals and odors from surfaces and fabrics, so you can only imagine what it does when consumed.

“It can eat away at your esophagus and enough of it can cause death,” said Mahoney.

Mahoney said he sees this trend mostly with juveniles.”There is more emphasis on drug testing in school, especially with sporting events and things like that, but there should be education to these Juveniles. You need to say ‘Yes, we are going to drug test and don’t try to mask it because if you do, you’re going to harm your body and this is what can happen,’” said Mahoney.

Mahoney said wreaking havoc on your insides is all bleach will do. Drug tests have gotten sophisticated and can determine the presence of foreign chemicals.

“Specific gravity tests will let us know the urine is not just pure urine coming from the body or if these other compounds are present or if there is a tremendous amount of water in the system where they’ve tried to flush the system,” said Mahoney.

Mahoney said there is one way to pass a drug test: Steer clear of illegal substances.

Mahoney said if you see someone drinking bleach, call poison control immediately or take them to the hospital.

United States has most online shops selling legal highs per EMCDDA-shocking information

Table 1: Likely country of origin for online shops in 2011 (*)
(Number of shops identified

United States 197
United Kingdom 121
Netherlands 61
Germany 50
New Zealand 31
Czech Republic 24
Poland 21
Canada 19
Hungary 15
Russia 11

Results
This snapshot identified 631 online shops selling new psychoactive substances/‘legal highs’
and shipping products to at least one EU Member State. This was twice the number of shops
identified in January 2011 (314 shops) and a more than three-fold increase from January
2010 (170 shops). As the search strings had been fine-tuned between the January and July
2011 snapshots, a check was undertaken to assess whether the increase resulted from these
methodological changes. A search conducted using strings identical to those used in January
generated similar results, indicating that the identified increase in number of shops was a
valid finding.
Establishing the country of origin for online shops is difficult. In cyberspace, with its lack of
geographical boundaries, it is not difficult for sites to present as having origins in one country
while operating from another. In addition, review of available indicators, such as contact
information, country code domain, currency and shipping information, can point to more than
one country. However, using the available parameters, it appeared that around a third of the
shops identified (197 of 631) were based in the United States of America, and a fifth were
based in the United Kingdom (Table 1). When compared with January 2011, the July 2011
snapshot identified a tripling of sites that were US-based and also increases in number of
shops whose country of origin appeared to be the United Kingdom, the Netherlands,
Germany, New Zealand, Poland and Canada. However, there were also exceptions to this,
with a stable number of ‘Russian’ online shops, and a slight decrease in the number of
‘Hungarian’ and ‘Romanian’ sites identified.

Most frequently identified new psychoactive substances/’legal highs on sale

Kratom
Salvia
Hallucinogenic mushrooms
MDAI (aminoindane)
Methoxetamine
(arylcyclohexylamine)
6-APB (benzofuran)-MEC (cathinone)
MDPV (cathinone)
Cactus
Methiopropamine (thiophene)
5-IAI (aminoindane)
Dimethocaine (benzoate)
Methylone (cathinone)
Hawaiian baby woodrose (active
principle lysergamides)

 

Online shops selling new drugs/‘legal highs’ operate on the edge of legality, and they are
often both vague and creative in the descriptions given of their products and their purported
uses. New psychoactive substances/‘legal highs’ may be sold as research chemicals, plant
food, bath salts, exotic incenses, room odourisers, pond cleaners etc., alongside more
indicative descriptors such as party pills, ethnobotanicals, herbal highs, and smoking blends.
The use of some of these terms has been volatile, for example mephedrone pre-control was
widely advertised as plant food, whereas after control ‘research chemical’ became common.

 

The EMCDDA’s briefing paper on ‘Online sales of new psychoactive substances / ‘legal highs’: summary of results from the 2011 multilingual snapshots’ is now available from their website.

http://www.emcdda.europa.eu/publications/scientific-studies/2011/snapshot

http://www.linkedin.com/redirect?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Eemcdda%2Eeuropa%2Eeu%2Fpublications%2Fscientific-studies%2F2011%2Fsnapshot&urlhash=2JK9&_t=tracking_disc

“FMSCA Figures Show Improved Trucking Safety Record”- because of less drug use USAMDT asks?

The number of large truck-involved fatal crashes declined by nearly one-third from 2007-2009, according to a new Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration statistical report.

The most recent fatality rates and numbers — which were quietly posted on FMCSA’s website last month — showed that crashes declined to 3,215, from 4,633.

It also said that number of large trucks in fatal crashes per 100 million vehicle miles traveled dropped in those same years from 1.32 to 1.12 — a downturn of 26%.

Fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles traveled declined to 1.17 in 2009, from 1.59 in 2007.

Since 2000, the fatal crash rate for large trucks has fallen 54.5% – more than twice as much as the passenger vehicle fatal crash rate, which dropped just 25% in the same time period.

These safety gains are the result of many things, sensible regulation, improvements in technology; slower, more fuel efficient driving; the dedication of professional drivers and safety directors [and] more effective enforcement techniques,” American Trucking Associations President Bill Graves said.

USA Mobile Drug Testing of Central Long Island adds that perhaps the fact that FMSCA has very strict drug and alcohol testing requirements for drivers under 49CFR Part40, that has also contributed to less accidents for the big trucks.  USAMDT advises that the drivers are required to have yearly random tests, with specific instructions for direct observation if there is an attempt to adulterate.  Supervisors are also required to have training on spotting the abuser and how to have them tested under reasonable suspicion rules. Drug and alcohol testing can only help keep our roads safer by getting the abuser off the truck and into some program to help them. USA Mobile Drug Testing  is on the road and mobile and can perform those mandatory drug and alcohol tests not only to keep your company compliant, but to save a life, which could be your own.

But Graves criticized FMCSA officials for not doing more to “share this good news” about trucking’s safety record. USA Mobile Drug Testing would like to congratulate FMCSA officials on their safety success and also would like to see them promote this information so truckers can see how rules can help them and not just give them more procedures to follow and more expenses.

“We are at a loss on why FMCSA chose not to communicate this final data indicating great safety progress,” Graves said in a statement.

Dave Osiecki, ATA’s senior vice president of policy and regulatory affairs, said the new figures were even more encouraging than those released in a preliminary truck safety report in April by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

An FMCSA spokeswoman said the only new information in the final report is the Federal Highway Administration’s vehicle miles traveled and vehicle registration data. The agency published the initial results last year when NHTSA released the data, she said.

Some items obtained from article by  Eric Miller,Staff Reporter Transport Topics

What is a drug-free workplace and can any company drug and alcohol test?

What is a drug-free workplace?

A drug-free workplace is a workplace free of the health, safety and productivity hazards caused by employees abuse of alcohol or drugs. To achieve a drug-free workplace, many employers develop drug-free workplace programs. A comprehensive drug-free workplace program generally includes five components—a drug-free workplace policy, supervisor training, employee education, employee assistance and drug testing. Although employers may choose not to include all five components, it is recommended that all be explored when developing a drug-free workplace program. Research shows that more components may lead to a more effective program. However, because every business is unique, there is no one right way to establish a drug-free workplace program.
Can an employer drug test ? What are the state laws?

Generally, employers have a fair amount of latitude in handling drug testing as they see fit, unless their organization is subject to certain Federal laws (such as U.S. Department of Transportation drug-testing regulations). However, there may be state laws that impact how drug testing is implemented. For more information, visit the Working Partners website’s listing of state laws that impact drug-free workplace issues or contact your State Department of Labor.

DOL strongly recommends that before any drug-testing program is implemented, an employer have a written policy that is shared with all employees and clearly outlines why drug-testing is being implemented, prohibited behaviors and the consequences for violating the policy. DOL also recommends that if drug testing is used, it be only one component of a comprehensive program that also includes training for supervisors on signs and symptoms of substance abuse, education for employees about the dangers of substance abuse and some form of assistance or support for employees who may have problems with alcohol and other drugs.

Is Your DOT Drug Testing Program Compliant?

USA Mobile Drug Testing Compliance Consultants are out in the field helping employers make sure that their required Department of Transportation (DOT) drug and alcohol testing programs are in compliance with Federal regulations. Employers that are regulated by DOT 49CFR Part 40 must ensure that service agents used meet the requirements of the regulations.

Recently, DOT again emphasized that many collectors and collection sites continue to make mistakes and errors during the collection process. Here is a listing of some of the recent errors pointed out by DOT officials:

Custody and Control Forms (CCFs) received are illegible. Collectors should review all copies of the CCF prior to distributing them to ensure that they are legible. In regards to copies that are to be faxed, if the writing is light then collectors should make a darker copy to be sent via fax.

MROs and Employers are reporting that they are not receiving their respective copies of the CCFs despite multiple requests. Per DOT regulations, collectors must send the CCFs within 24 hours or the next business day and must keep their copies of CCFs for at least 30 days.

Collectors are not marking step 1D in the CCF to indicate the transportation mode that the collection is for (FAA, FRA, FTA, FMCSA, etc.). This is a new step for the CCF and collection sites should be sure to post notices within the collection area reminding collectors to mark this information on the CCF.

The donor initialing of the specimen bottle labels is being done while the labels are on the CCF contrary to DOT regulations that require the labels be signed on the specimen bottle.

Collectors are not adequately informing donors that leaving the collection site prior to the completion of the collection process (with the exception of pre-employment tests) is considered a refusal to test.

Employers – you should be monitoring the collection facilities or collectors that you hire to make sure they are performing collections correctly and not making the errors noted above. It is an employer’s responsibility to make sure that the process is in compliance. Ask your collectors about their training and about their procedures. Many collectors have not received the five year refresher training required by DOT.

Clients of USA Mobile Drug Testing can be assured that their collections are done properly in complete compliance with all Federal, State and DOT regulations. USAMDT Compliance Consultants meet the highest standards in the industry with over 120 hours of training completed prior to opening their territory. All collectors utilized by USA Mobile Drug Testing have met all of the DOT qualifications for training and proficiency. You can be assured that trained professional collectors from USA Mobile Drug Testing will not make the mistakes listed above. Remember that USA Mobile Drug Testing Compliance Consultants always come to your location to administer all testing and make it compliant, simple, quick and cost-efficient for you.

What State is tops in drug & alcohol abuse in the country..Washington DC

Drug and alcohol abuse rates are higher in the District than anywhere else in the country, and experts say the wide availability of drugs, high stress levels and difficulties getting abusers into treatment fuel the city’s persistently stratospheric rates.

A new report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration found that 11.3 percent of people 12 and older abused or were dependent on alcohol or drugs in the past year, well above the national average of 8.9 percent. Maryland’s abuse rate was 8.1 percent and Virginia’s was 9.4 percent.

Drug and alcohol problems have long been a problem in all corners of the nation’s capital, from drug deals on street corners to college binge drinking to the White House — even former first lady Betty Ford admitted to a long battle with drinking and painkiller addiction after she left 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

Other findings
Some other details from the SAMSHA report:
» Virginia was the only state to report a decrease in past-month alcohol use among people 12 and older, with a drop from 53.5 percent to 50.8 percent.
» Maryland had the nation’s lowest rate of past-year mental illness for adults at 16.7 percent. The national rate was 19.7 percent; the District’s was 21 percent and Virginia’s was 18.5 percent.
Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Related…
Keeping youths away from drugs, drinking is D.C.’s focus

D.C. officials say the city has focused its drug- and alcohol-prevention efforts on youths, and that appears to be paying off: The percent of District teenagers addicted to illicit substances is among the lowest in the country. Read More

“You can find drugs in any quadrant of the city,” said George Wheeler, who runs Circles of Hope, an addiction counseling center.

The SAMHSA report is based on national drug surveys from 2008 and 2009 and interviews. It found the abuse rate in the District is down from 11.9 percent in 2002 and 2003 surveys. The most widely used drugs in the District are alcohol, marijuana and cocaine, according to the survey.

In D.C., politicians, lobbyists and others regularly attend functions where “work is socializing,” said Babette Wise, director of the alcohol and drug abuse program at Georgetown University Hospital. That makes overindulging — including to the point of abuse — easy, Wise said. But because the drinking is tied to work, she said, it’s harder for them or others to recognize a problem.

“People will think, ‘How can my relative be an addict when he has this high position or she’s making all this money?’ ” Wise said.

Dr. Daniel Z. Lieberman, a psychiatry professor at George Washington University, said stress from those high-pressure careers and poverty can both lead to drug abuse — and D.C. has large populations that fall into those groups.

In D.C., many people who need help aren’t getting it: 8.6 percent of city residents 12 and older are abusing or dependent on alcohol but not getting help, and 3.3 percent have drug addictions but aren’t in treatment, SAMHSA found. Those are among the highest rates in the country.

The numbers include people who don’t know how to get help, don’t think they need it, can’t find treatment and can’t afford care, among other reasons, said Peter Delany, director of SAMHSA’s Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality.

Lieberman said people often end up in the hospital after an addiction-related emergency, and long-term recovery is most successful if the person gets to a drug treatment center within a few days of leaving the hospital.

“That’s when their motivation is going to be highest,” he said. But Lieberman said that’s not always possible in D.C., and patients often end up waiting much longer or go a facility that isn’t their first choice.

Dr. Kimberly Jeffries Leonard, senior deputy director for the District’s Addiction Prevention and Recovery Administration, maintained that “anyone who walks through our doors can get help” and said there was no waiting list for treatment slots.

The District is training primary care doctors, mental-health-services providers and HIV treatment centers to screen people for alcohol and drug problems, Leonard said, because abusers often don’t seek help on their own.

Wise said 12-step programs are free and readily available in the District, with about 1,700 across the city, and the hardest part is getting an abuser to realize they need long-term support.

“That’s what’s going to keep them sober for life,” she said.

ebabay@washingtonexaminer.com

Read more at the Washington Examiner: http://washingtonexaminer.com/local/2011/07/dc-tops-nation-drug-alcohol-abuse#ixzz1duPG3Ak5

Whites More Likely to Abuse Drugs Than Blacks

By Maia Szalavitz Monday, November 7, 2011 From TimeHealthland

Black youth are arrested for drug crimes at a rate ten times higher than that of whites. But new research shows that young African Americans are actually less likely to use drugs and less likely to develop substance use disorders, compared to whites, Native Americans, Hispanics and people of mixed race.

“Our goal is to alert people to the burden of drug problems and also to how some of our concern about who has these problems may not be true,” says Dr. Dan Blazer, senior author of the study and a professor of psychiatry at Duke University. “There’s a perception among many individuals that African Americans as a group — regardless of socioeconomic status — tend to abuse or use drugs at higher rate and this [does not support] that.”

Using data from 72,561 youth interviewed for the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, researchers found that 37% of those aged between 12 and 17 had used alcohol or other drugs at least once in the past year. Nearly 8% met criteria for a substance use disorder — either the less severe “substance abuse” diagnosis or the more problematic “substance dependence,” which is more commonly known as addiction.

The study, which was published Monday in the Archives of General Psychiatry, controlled for variables like socioeconomic status because rates of severe drug problems tend to be greater amongst the poor. Despite this, Native American youth fared worst, with 15% having a substance use disorder, compared to 9.2% for people of mixed racial heritage, 9.0% for whites, 7.7% for Hispanics, 5% for African Americans and 3.5% for Asians and Pacific Islanders.

It is not known why rates for Native Americans were so elevated, but the category of substance use disorders does include alcoholism, a disorder for which this group is known to be at high risk. Marijuana and prescription opioid problems also occurred at higher rates in Native Americans.

Read more: http://healthland.time.com/2011/11/07/study-whites-more-likely-to-abuse-drugs-than-blacks/#ixzz1dni01JAJ
Maia Szalavitz is a health writer at TIME.com. Find her on Twitter at @maiasz. You can also continue the discussion on TIME Healthland’s Facebook page and on Twitter at @TIMEHealthland.

Flesh-Eating Drugs Hit California and USA from Russia

I found this disturbing article in the GAWKER, don’t know how true it is about Russia or the photos, but it is something to be aware of, any unknown substance can turn up in cocaine or any of these designer drugs that are now popular. There is a video attachment from a US news station that claims it is in California.

Flesh-Eating Drugs Hit U.S., Russia
http://gawker.com/5814260/flesh+eating-drugs-hit-us-russia

You should really stop doing cocaine. Not because it’s addictive, or anything, but because it’s likely laced with levamisole, a veterinary drug used for de-worming livestock, and it will make your flesh rot off.

A new report being published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology finds six patients who “developed purple-colored patches of necrotic skin on their ears, nose, cheeks and other parts of their body,” apparently thanks to levamisole-cut coke. And, they say, that’s just “the tip of the iceberg in a looming public health problem”!

According to the Department of Justice, some 70 percent of cocaine (most of it distributed in and around New York and L.A.) is cut with levamisole. We’d say, Who cares? Doesn’t this just mean that every investment banker in New York will lose both ears? but our understanding is that i-bankers have moved on to Adderall and the ground-up finger bones of poor people. If you are in a bad rotting-flesh situation, we recommend switching drug dealers, which apparently worked for one patient the doctors wrote about in their report.

Meanwhile in Russia, the government and medical authorities are agitating against “krokodil” (“Крокодил” or “crocodile”), an insane newish opiate cooked by addicts in their kitchens out of “gasoline, paint thinner, hydrochloric acid, iodine and red phosphorous” plus the key ingredient, codeine. Why is it called “crocodile”? Why, because bursting blood vessels at the injection site (which can be anywhere on the body! Even the forehead!) turns the skin “greenish and scaly.”

“The average user,” Time reports, “does not live longer than two or three years, and the few who manage to quit usually come away disfigured.” Animal New York collected a few disgusting photos; they could be fake, but the Russian news film to the left is plenty gross and plenty real. (Don’t watch it on a full stomach.)

As it is, there’s not much the Russian government is currently doing to help, meaning that the care and treatment for the population of addicts—some 2.5 million total, with the number of krokdil addicts somewhere in the hundreds of thousands—lies largely with Russian Evangelical churches, which run some 500 rehab centers. A government meeting about the problem, Time writes, “has led to a meandering public debate” about the country’s drug policies, but no real change yet.

[http://gawker.com/5814260/flesh+eating-drugs-hit-us-russia

Post Navigation